Dr. Svati Shah with her husband, Dr. Patrick Hranitzky, and sons Kieran and Kellan. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Svati Shah) Onstage at the Miss America 2020 pageant, Dr. Svati Shah looked into the camera and delivered her important message. It wasn’t merely that heart disease and stroke kill more women than all forms of cancer combined….

Gabriel Oluka, two days after heart valve replacement surgery at the Uganda Heart Institute in December 2018. (Photo courtesy of the Oluka family) Much as he tried, Gabriel Oluka could never keep up with other children. As he got older, he experienced heaviness in his chest, frequent sore throats and occasional painful joints. Sometimes his breathing…

(Science Photo Library, Getty Images) Nearly two-thirds of people who survive an often-deadly type of stroke caused by bleeding in the brain continue to experience high blood pressure because they aren’t taking enough medication, new research shows. The preliminary study, presented this week at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles, found…

On March 1, 2019, Alfredo Fresnedo had a weird feeling in his stomach on the way to work as a real estate agent. He dismissed it as lingering effects of the stomach virus he’d had the week before that had left him unusually weak. As the symptoms faded away, he drank some water, got to…

(MicroStockHub/iStock, Getty Images) Lea en español Red dresses and pink ribbons have helped millions of Americans become aware of the separate tolls heart disease and breast cancer take on women. But not everyone is aware of how the illnesses can intersect. Heart disease – the No. 1 killer of women – can sometimes be a…

(Ahmad Faizal Yahya/EyeEm, Getty Images) A rare, inherited muscle disorder that occurs in about 1 in 8,000 people, myotonic dystrophy also can affect the heart and other organs. A new set of expert recommendations offers guidance for managing the progressive condition. “Your average cardiologist doesn’t see this all the time, so it can often get…

(FatCamera/E+, Getty Images) People with persistent asthma could be at 1.5 times higher risk of developing a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation than those without asthma, new research shows. The study used data collected on 6,615 people in six areas around the country who were followed for nearly 13 years. When the study started,…