(smartboy10/DigitalVision Vectors, Getty Images) In recent years, health care experts have warmed to the idea that lots of seemingly non-medical factors – income, housing, education – can significantly affect a person’s health. And many professionals now say one of those so-called social determinants of health, one that might affect a family for generations, is immigration….

(aldomurillo/E+, Getty Images) The Hispanic population over 65 will nearly quadruple in the next 40 years, eventually representing nearly 1 in 5 older Americans. And growing alongside the population will be the daunting challenge of age-related dementia. But unlike some other population groups, there may be more they can do to try and prevent it….

(kali9/E+, Getty Images) Neighborhoods filled with trees, grass and other flora not only improve the air and clear the mind – they also can reduce heart disease risk, recent studies suggest. Researchers say this may be more vital in low-income areas, whether that’s an inner-city neighborhood swallowed up by concrete and metal or a suburb…

Urban Renaissance Center executive director Rev. Robert McCathern. (Photo courtesy of Derrick Poe) A music production studio, boxing lessons, employment programs, and health and wellness projects – just some of the elements it takes to reinvigorate a community. It’s the work of the Urban Renaissance Center in Flint, Michigan, a nonprofit restoring life to Civic…

Cherie Craft shares a laugh with a child at Smart from the Start, the Boston organization she founded to help economically disadvantaged children. (Photo courtesy of Cherie Craft) This is supposed to be a story about an inner-city Boston organization that helps economically disadvantaged children prepare to join the school system by age 5. So…

(DenisTangney/E+, Getty Images) Americans who live in counties with high poverty rates are more likely to die from heart failure compared to people living in more affluent areas, new research says. The prevalence of diabetes and obesity largely explained the link, said the researchers, whose work was published Wednesday in the Journal of the American…

(Robert Nicholas/OJO Images, Getty Images) How long people stay in school may play a significant role in predicting how well those with coronary heart disease will fare, according to new research that linked lower levels of school completion with a higher risk of heart attack and death. Education level has been known to influence people’s…

(Karl Tapales, Getty Images) After quitting his job as a cancer researcher, Aristotle “Ari” Mannan became a community health worker on the streets of Boston. He kept running into Huey, a 56-year-old homeless man who drank mouthwash and wore a green hospital gown because he spent so much time in emergency rooms. When Huey suddenly…

Leon El-Alamin (left) and Tim Abdul-Matin left prison determined to improve their community. (Photo courtesy of Leon El-Alamin) At 18, Leon Wilson was getting quite a reputation for selling cocaine in the Pierson neighborhood on the North Side of Flint, Michigan. His name started ringing through the streets, eventually reaching Leon Parks. His dad. Father…

(digitalskillet1, Adobe Stock) Black and Hispanic people having a stroke are less likely than their white counterparts to get treatments proven to reduce death and improve quality of life, new research shows. For strokes caused by a clot, the gold standard treatment is a clot-busting drug called alteplase, according to guidelines from the American Heart…