(Cavan Images, Getty Images) Women are just as likely as men to survive after a heart transplant despite often getting poorer-quality donor hearts, according to new research. The findings, published this week in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, sought to shed new light on what role, if any, gender plays in surviving a…

(Westend61, Getty Images) When family demands affect work performance or work demands undermine family obligations, the resulting stress may contribute to decreased heart health, particularly among women, a new study finds. The study, published Thursday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds another factor for doctors and patients to evaluate in treating cardiovascular…

(pressmaster, Depositphotos) Heart disease is the nation’s leading killer of women. But paying attention to risk factors and living a healthy lifestyle can help keep heart disease at bay. “It’s an equal opportunity killer,” said Dr. Jennifer Mieres, a professor of cardiology at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in New York. “Women in…

(petrunjela/iStock, Getty Images) Women who have complications during their first pregnancy are more likely to develop high blood pressure within seven years, according to new research. The study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked into whether problems during first pregnancies such as early deliveries, smaller-than-average babies, stillbirths and preeclampsia might…

(Tinpixels/E+, Getty Images) Women are less likely than men to receive a mechanical heart pump that is becoming the norm for people with advanced heart failure, according to new research. The study, published Friday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, took a deeper look at long-standing differences in how women are treated…

(andresr/E+, Getty Images) Researchers have identified a protein that may be a risk factor for both high blood pressure and breast cancer. Previous studies have found women with high blood pressure have about a 15% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to women with normal blood pressure. High levels of the protein GRK4 (G-protein…

(Geri Lavrov, Getty Images) Pregnant women with lower concentrations of the trace mineral manganese or higher amounts of the metal cadmium in their blood may be more likely to develop preeclampsia, according to a new study. Preeclampsia is a leading contributor to illness and death for women during and immediately following pregnancy. There are very…

(belchonock, Depositphotos) “Radial pulse waves” might sound other-worldly, but they’re a relatively easy way to measure heartbeats through the artery at the base of the wrist. And new research says they can detect circulatory system changes in menopausal women that aren’t evident with traditional blood pressure readings. Researchers measured the waves’ harmonics. Chi-Wei Chang, lead…

(serezniy, Depositphotos) Improving cardiovascular health during the early stages of pregnancy can lead not only to a healthier pregnancy, it also can greatly improve a woman’s long-term heart health, new research shows. The findings, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, underscore the importance of entering pregnancy in optimal health. They also…

(Jose Luis Pelaez Inc, DigitalVision/Getty Images) A new study confirms that when it comes to assessing heart health, an important question a doctor can ask an African American woman is, “Did you have complications during a pregnancy?” The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, analyzed data collected on 439 African…