(Charday Penn/E+, Getty Images) Lea en español Grief is a common, if not universal, human experience. But that doesn’t make it simple. It’s psychological, but it affects people physically. It’s a matter of science, but scientists who discuss it can sound poetic. Dr. Katherine Shear, professor of psychiatry at Columbia University School of Social Work…

(blackCAT/E+, Getty Images) Lea en español Stuck in traffic, with a nasty storm making a stressful commute even worse, Joanne Loewy reached for the car radio. “I felt my heartbeat rise,” said Loewy, director of the Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York City. “So I switched…

(Gado Images/Photodisc, Getty Images) Some patients looking to reschedule annual physicals, wellness visits or other routine medical appointments long delayed by COVID-19 first may need to make time to find a new doctor. Thousands of practices have closed because of the pandemic, a recent survey shows, with thousands more planning to close in 2021. Finding…

(Dimitri Otis/Stone, Getty Images) Lea en español It doesn’t take a scientist to understand that laughter feels good, while anger feels awful. But it does take one to explain why one of these feelings can boost the immune system, while the other can wear it down, damage the heart and increase the risk for dementia….

(Nastasic/E+, Getty Images) Testosterone therapy may boost hormone levels in older men, but it won’t help their arteries work better, new research shows. The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, showed men ages 50 to 70 with a larger-than-normal waist size and low-to-normal level of testosterone could boost the health and…

(Yuliya Papkova/iStock, Getty Images) Reducing sodium intake by any amount can lower blood pressure over the long term – and may benefit everyone, including people with normal blood pressure, new research shows. While the link between consuming less-salty foods and lower blood pressure is well established, researchers wanted to understand the exact nature of the…

(Elena Brovko/iStock, Getty Images) Lea en español Keeping track of your heart rate is probably a good thing. Obsessing about it probably isn’t. That’s one drawback of the increasing popularity of wearable devices that constantly monitor heart rates, said Dr. Tracy Stevens, a cardiologist at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri….

(Westend61, Getty Images) Drinking one or more cups of coffee a day may reduce the risk of heart failure, according to new research. But only if it’s caffeinated. The analysis of data from three large, well-known heart disease trials was published Tuesday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure. It found the more…

(Westend61, Getty Images) This story is part of Eat It or Leave It?, a series that provides a closer look at the pros and cons associated with certain foods and drinks – and cooking options if you decide to eat them. This Super Bowl Sunday, millions of Americans will reach for avocados to make guacamole,…

(Alextype/iStock, Getty Images) Drinking large amounts of green tea or a single cup of coffee each day may reduce the risk of death for people who survive heart attacks and strokes, new research shows. The study, published Thursday in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, found Japanese stroke survivors who drank at least seven cups…