(monkeybusinessimages/iStock, Getty Images) Lea en español It’s a worthy, healthy goal to take 10,000 steps each day, but that magic number didn’t come from doctors or physical trainers. In the mid-1960s, Japanese marketers trying to sell a pedometer named it manpo-kei, which generally translates to “10,000 step meter” in English. The Japanese character for “10,000”…

(Bjarte Rettedal/Photodisc, Getty Images) A health education class tailored to South Asian culture was associated with improvements in certain cardiac risk factors and lower odds of death among participants, a new study shows. South Asians – those with ethnic descent from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, the Maldives or Bhutan – develop coronary artery…

(Kenishirotie/iStock, Getty Images) Consuming high levels of sodium and low levels of potassium may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a new study that sought to reaffirm the role sodium plays in cardiovascular disease. On average, Americans eat about 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day, much of that from store-bought packaged foods and…

(Kubra Cavus/iStock, Getty Images) Caffeinated coffee may come with a blend of short-term benefits and harms, according to a study that monitored its health effects in real time. Researchers who closely monitored 100 volunteers for two weeks in a randomized controlled trial found participants logged more steps a day on days when they drank coffee…

Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones gives his Presidential Address at Scientific Sessions. (American Heart Association) About a decade ago, scientists found that people can lower their risk of heart disease and stroke by managing seven easily understood risk factors – things like diet, exercise and smoking status. This collection was dubbed “Life’s Simple 7.” The way it…

Health experts discussed COVID-19 vaccine development and cardiovascular disease implications on Saturday at the American Heart Association’s virtual Scientific Sessions. Top row, from left: Nicole Purcell, Dr. Mikael Dolsten and Stéphane Bancel. Bottom row, from left: Dr. Mina Chung, Raymond Vara Jr., Dr. Manesh Patel, Nancy Brown and Dr. Biykem Bozkurt. (American Heart Association) Leaders…

(Deepak Sethi/iStock, Getty Images) Gay men and bisexual women may have higher rates of high blood pressure than their heterosexual counterparts, according to new research. The study analyzed self-reported data from 424,255 participants, including 1.8% who were gay or lesbian and 2.3% who were bisexual. After adjusting for demographics, insurance, body mass index and smoking…

Play without Auto-Play Play Video Text A little after 9 p.m. on a Friday in July, Dr. Kevin Volpp arrived at a restaurant in Cincinnati with his 15-year-old daughter Daphne, her squash coach and some friends. Everyone was tired and eager for a good meal. Daphne was coming off her second long, intense match of…

(THEPALMER/E+, Getty Images) Young American Indians with early signs of plaque in their arteries may be especially vulnerable to heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular conditions later in life, according to new research that calls for earlier interventions. Atherosclerosis is a common and potentially dangerous condition because it reduces blood flow wherever plaque develops, be…

(Ebrahim Alshawy/EyeEm, Getty Images) Acrolein, crotonaldehyde and styrene, compounds found in everything from cigarette smoke to plastics, were associated with higher blood pressure measurements for both the top, systolic, and bottom, diastolic, numbers. “Acrolein is a well-known cardiotoxic chemical, and styrene had a causative signal with diastolic blood pressure,” said lead researcher Katlyn E. McGraw,…