(praetorianphoto/iStock, Getty Images) By screening for breast cancer, mammography has helped save hundreds of thousands of lives. Using the test to also screen for heart disease might someday help save many thousands more. Though expert guidelines vary, generally women are advised to have a mammogram every year or two starting at age 40 or 50….

(yulkapopkova, Getty Images) One in five women of childbearing age has high blood pressure, according to a new study that found few of these women are on a diet that could help them – and their babies – reduce their risk for health problems. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, in pregnancy is a…

(Eraxion/iStock, Getty Images) Women are at higher risk for stroke and have different stroke symptoms than men. New research suggests another difference: less benefit from a surgery used to treat carotid artery disease, a key risk factor for stroke. The disease, also called carotid stenosis, is marked by fatty deposits, called plaque, that build up…

(Cavan Images, Getty Images) Women are just as likely as men to survive after a heart transplant despite often getting poorer-quality donor hearts, according to new research. The findings, published this week in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, sought to shed new light on what role, if any, gender plays in surviving a…

(Westend61, Getty Images) When family demands affect work performance or work demands undermine family obligations, the resulting stress may contribute to decreased heart health, particularly among women, a new study finds. The study, published Thursday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds another factor for doctors and patients to evaluate in treating cardiovascular…

(pressmaster, Depositphotos) Heart disease is the nation’s leading killer of women. But paying attention to risk factors and living a healthy lifestyle can help keep heart disease at bay. “It’s an equal opportunity killer,” said Dr. Jennifer Mieres, a professor of cardiology at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in New York. “Women in…

(petrunjela/iStock, Getty Images) Women who have complications during their first pregnancy are more likely to develop high blood pressure within seven years, according to new research. The study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked into whether problems during first pregnancies such as early deliveries, smaller-than-average babies, stillbirths and preeclampsia might…

(Tinpixels/E+, Getty Images) Women are less likely than men to receive a mechanical heart pump that is becoming the norm for people with advanced heart failure, according to new research. The study, published Friday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, took a deeper look at long-standing differences in how women are treated…

(andresr/E+, Getty Images) Researchers have identified a protein that may be a risk factor for both high blood pressure and breast cancer. Previous studies have found women with high blood pressure have about a 15% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to women with normal blood pressure. High levels of the protein GRK4 (G-protein…

(Geri Lavrov, Getty Images) Pregnant women with lower concentrations of the trace mineral manganese or higher amounts of the metal cadmium in their blood may be more likely to develop preeclampsia, according to a new study. Preeclampsia is a leading contributor to illness and death for women during and immediately following pregnancy. There are very…